Hear from a world-renowned expert on vaccines and blood clots – ICST

Hear from a world-renowned expert on vaccines and blood clots

Tutorial presented by Professor Beverley Hunt, a national and international expert in thrombosis and acquired bleeding disorders, Consultant of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and Professor of Thrombosis and Haemostasis at King’s College London. Beverley sits on the NICE guideline development group, she chairs the steering committee of World Thrombosis Day campaign, and is co-founder and medical director of Thrombosis UK, a charity working to increase awareness, support research, extend understanding and improve care for all those affected by thrombosis.

In this tutorial, Beverley introduces vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome, an extremely rare immune response to a vaccine causing thrombosis (blood clots) and thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), most commonly following the Astra-Zeneca vaccine.

Blood clots form in unusual sites, including cerebral vein thrombosis, splanchnic vein thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Typical presentation include:

  • Very low platelet count
  • More severe thrombosis
  • Antibodies to PF4

It is unclear who is more at risk, but it is an immune response and there is no evidence that individuals with a prior history of thrombosis or known risk factors for thrombosis are more at risk.

If a patient presents with severe headache, severe abdominal pain or symptoms of DTV or PE, 5 days or more after a vaccine, they need to be seen in the emergency department for assessment.

NICE has published (29 July 2021) a new rapid guideline to diagnose and treat rare blood clotting condition associated with COVID-19 vaccination.

Hear from a world-renowned expert on vaccines and blood clots

Tutorial presented by Professor Beverley Hunt, a national and international expert in thrombosis and acquired bleeding disorders, Consultant of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and Professor of Thrombosis and Haemostasis at King’s College London. Beverley sits on the NICE guideline development group, she chairs the steering committee of World Thrombosis Day campaign, and is co-founder and medical director of Thrombosis UK, a charity working to increase awareness, support research, extend understanding and improve care for all those affected by thrombosis.

In this tutorial, Beverley introduces vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome, an extremely rare immune response to a vaccine causing thrombosis (blood clots) and thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), most commonly following the Astra-Zeneca vaccine.

Blood clots form in unusual sites, including cerebral vein thrombosis, splanchnic vein thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Typical presentation include:

  • Very low platelet count
  • More severe thrombosis
  • Antibodies to PF4

It is unclear who is more at risk, but it is an immune response and there is no evidence that individuals with a prior history of thrombosis or known risk factors for thrombosis are more at risk.

If a patient presents with severe headache, severe abdominal pain or symptoms of DTV or PE, 5 days or more after a vaccine, they need to be seen in the emergency department for assessment.

NICE has published (29 July 2021) a new rapid guideline to diagnose and treat rare blood clotting condition associated with COVID-19 vaccination.

Mark as Understood

© Institute of Clinical Science and Technology (ICST) 2020

Support: admin@clinicalscience.org.uk